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"Just dance" with digital literacy

ALIA Information Online 2015 Conference, 2-5 February 2015 Sydney : at the edge.
This conference  paper provides an analysis of a case study in which liaison librarians collaborated with science academics to develop innovative digital literacy activities and assessment tasks for undergraduate units related to ‘Judging Reliability and Accuracy of Information’.
The case study reveals that engaging students in meaningful learning activities and assessment tasks creates dynamic and powerful learning experiences for first and second year students. In addition, the leadership that the liaison librarians demonstrate in activities that capitalise on problem based learning, elements of gaming, peer assessment, and new ways of communicating has prompted open conversations and collaborations with academics about further opportunities.

'Just dance' with digital literacy

ALIA Information Online 2015 Conference, 2-5 February 2015 Sydney: at the edge.
This conference presentation provides an analysis of a case study in which liaison librarians collaborated with science academics to develop innovative digital literacy activities and assessment tasks for undergraduate units related to ‘Judging Reliability and Accuracy of Information’.
The case study reveals that engaging students in meaningful learning activities and assessment tasks creates dynamic and powerful learning experiences for first and second year students. In addition, the leadership that the liaison librarians demonstrate in activities that capitalise on problem based learning, elements of gaming, peer assessment, and new ways of communicating has prompted open conversations and collaborations with academics about further opportunities.

"We have lift off": the voyage into social space [slides]

National Library and Information Technicians' Symposium, 13-15 November 2019 Melbourne: Discover, Diversify, Dive In
 
This presentation (PowerPoint slides) accompanied the session which discussed expanding library services into social spaces, and the challenge of establishing a social presence for community building through Facebook.
 
Session description: We live in a networked society with billions of people connected to the Internet. This increasingly connected world has fundamentally changed the way we live, work and socialise. New forms of social connection have evolved and continue to do so with the emergence of Web 2.0 social media technologies. Social networking sites have fast become the preferred platforms for many types of activities both personal and business. It is essential for libraries to become increasingly more visual and participatory in the social spaces in which people frequent in order to make connections and facilitate more effective communication, collaboration and community building beyond the library's physical self.
 
Social media can be an effective information dissemination tool for libraries to promote resources, activities, services and events. If used correctly, internet-based social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter for example, become powerful platforms for library outreach and marketing. The key decision for libraries embarking on the journey into the social networking sphere is determining what social sites to implement; what will best fit the library's requirements in terms of functionality, features and most importantly the ability to reach and engage with patrons and potential patrons. 

#LibrarianFashion: how we used our personal style to collaborate on a video for the IFLA World Library and Information Congress [slides]

ALIA New Librarians' Symposium 9 (NLS9), 5-7 July 2019 Adelaide: collaborate deviate innovate
 
This presentation (PowerPoint slides) supported the talk on how three librarians collaborated across cities (and sometimes countries) using social media and online tools in order to present at the 2018 IFLA World Library and Information Congress. 

#LibrarianFashion: how we used our personal style to collaborate on a video for the IFLA World Library and Information Congress [video]

ALIA New Librarians' Symposium 9 (NLS9), 5-7 July 2019 Adelaide: collaborate deviate innovate
 
Recording (MP4 audiovisual) of session on how three librarians collaborated across cities (and sometimes countries) using social media and online tools in order to present at the 2018 IFLA World Library and Information Congress. 

"It’s what we do here": Embedding evidence-based practice at USQ Library

Asia-Pacific Library and Information Conference 2018, 30 July - 2 August 2018 Gold Coast: Roar Leap Dare
 
This conference paper discusses the creation of a role dedicated to embedding evidence-based practice into Australian academic libraries. By explicitly positioning evidence-based practice so prominently within USQ Library we are taking a leap forward, using local, professional and research evidence to transform our collections, spaces and services in response to ever-evolving client needs.
 
Over the past two decades, evidence-based practice and its application to library and information science has been an ongoing topic of discussion among researchers and practitioners. Evidence-based practice refers to a structured process of collecting, interpreting and applying valid and reliable research and evidence to support decision making and continuous service improvement in professional practice. Earlier research focused on how librarians perceive and experience evidence-based practice, and the benefits of doing so.  In 2016, the University of Southern Queensland Library chose to intentionally incorporate evidence-based practice, by creating a role explicitly dedicated to enabling capacity among staff and to develop the library’s evidence base. While other libraries may have a person responsible for analysing data and statistics, the Coordinator, Evidence-based Practice, is charged with a broader mandate – to work with library staff to develop tools, skills and expertise in evidence-based practice. By doing this, we aim to enable the library to demonstrate value to stakeholders, gain a deeper understanding of clients’ needs and experiences, promote robust decision making and improve service delivery.
 
This paper draws on recent research and the broader, existing understanding of evidence-based library and information practice to describe why this role was created and how the Coordinator, Evidence-based Practice is working to engage with library staff to understand their business and the evidence needed to support business improvement for the Library.  The paper will discuss how we have supported a culture of evidence-based practice and the benefits of having a dedicated role has had on building the capacity of library staff as evidence-based practitioners. USQ Library is still at the beginning of the journey in developing, not only the evidence-based practice function, but also harnessing the potential of the local evidence base to support the university’s strategic goals and objectives. The new role of Coordinator, Evidence-Based Practice, demonstrates evidence-based practice in action.  It represents a clear strategic and intentional commitment by decision makers to make evidence-based practice a visible, embedded and valuable part of professional practice at USQ Library. 
 
 

 

"It’s what we do here": Embedding evidence-based practice at USQ Library [slides]

Asia-Pacific Library and Information Conference 2018, 30 July - 2 August 2018 Gold Coast: Roar Leap Dare
 
This conference presentation (PowerPoint slides) supports the paper which discusses the creation of a role dedicated to embedding evidence-based practice into Australian academic libraries. By explicitly positioning evidence-based practice so prominently within USQ Library we are taking a leap forward, using local, professional and research evidence to transform our collections, spaces and services in response to ever-evolving client needs.
 
Over the past two decades, evidence-based practice and its application to library and information science has been an ongoing topic of discussion among researchers and practitioners. Evidence-based practice refers to a structured process of collecting, interpreting and applying valid and reliable research and evidence to support decision making and continuous service improvement in professional practice. Earlier research focused on how librarians perceive and experience evidence-based practice, and the benefits of doing so.  In 2016, the University of Southern Queensland Library chose to intentionally incorporate evidence-based practice, by creating a role explicitly dedicated to enabling capacity among staff and to develop the library’s evidence base. While other libraries may have a person responsible for analysing data and statistics, the Coordinator, Evidence-based Practice, is charged with a broader mandate – to work with library staff to develop tools, skills and expertise in evidence-based practice. By doing this, we aim to enable the library to demonstrate value to stakeholders, gain a deeper understanding of clients’ needs and experiences, promote robust decision making and improve service delivery.
 
This paper draws on recent research and the broader, existing understanding of evidence-based library and information practice to describe why this role was created and how the Coordinator, Evidence-based Practice is working to engage with library staff to understand their business and the evidence needed to support business improvement for the Library.  The paper will discuss how we have supported a culture of evidence-based practice and the benefits of having a dedicated role has had on building the capacity of library staff as evidence-based practitioners. USQ Library is still at the beginning of the journey in developing, not only the evidence-based practice function, but also harnessing the potential of the local evidence base to support the university’s strategic goals and objectives. The new role of Coordinator, Evidence-Based Practice, demonstrates evidence-based practice in action.  It represents a clear strategic and intentional commitment by decision makers to make evidence-based practice a visible, embedded and valuable part of professional practice at USQ Library. 
 
 

 

"Same truth, different reality": information literacy practices in vocational and vocational/higher education TAFE libraries

ALIA National 2014 Conference, 15-19 September 2014 Melbourne : together we are stronger
The aim of this conference presentation is to examine the differences in information literacy (IL) practices for VET students from TAFE libraries across Vocational only and Vocational and Higher Education delivering, TAFE institutes.
It will examine the content, delivery methods and barriers of IL practices across these two types of TAFE institution with a view to identify the likely differences facing IL programs in different types of TAFE library, and to provide suggestions on how best to tailor the IL practices to suit the particular student and teacher cohort.

A daring challenge: how to reinvent a library service [slides]

Asia-Pacific Library and Information Conference 2018, 30 July - 2 August 2018 Gold Coast: Roar Leap Dare
 
This conference presentation (PowerPoint slides) accompanies the paper which discusses the experience of re-establishing the Allan Bean Centre (ABC) Library service following the 2011 Christchurch earthquake.
 
Libraries for patients in hospitals and rehabilitation centres have a long history internationally, of supporting patients during their rehabilitation. An example of such a library is the Allan Bean Centre (ABC) based at Burwood Hospital in Christchurch a client centred, inclusive and visionary approach towards information provision for people with a spinal core injury (SCI). The ABC library’s main objective is to foster the wellbeing and recovery of patients through offering a range of materials and services; for example, therapy, education and training —by providing an holistic library service consisting of good quality information, resources and training.
 
Six years after the Christchurch earthquakes of 2011 the Allan Bean Centre Library was demolished. The loss of the library had a significant impact on the hospital’s patients, families and whanau and people with disabilities in the Christchurch community. The challenge for any library that loses its building is how to carry on and continue as normal.  As the Allan Bean Centre is not for profit — there were no funds to rebuild. Whilst waiting for a solution the ABC Library reinvented itself by setting up a number of initiatives.  There were other challenges to face which necessitated creative thinking and daring. Three years later, the library is still in a state of flux, although there is the possibility of a new space becoming available in the future. 
 
In the interim the ABC library must continue to provide resources, training and information to patients and their families and carers. This paper will report on the initiatives employed and how collaboration with a number of agencies was imperative.  

 

Australian Library and Information Association Annual Report 2020

 
Contents: About ALIA -- President's report -- Chief Executive Officer's report -- Director Corporate Services' report -- Director of Learning's report -- Director of Conferences and Events' report -- How we performed against the ALIA Board's strategic plan -- Our membership -- Advocacy campaigns -- Government and stakeholder relations -- Conferences and events -- ALIA in the regions -- Education, professional development and training -- Awards -- Communications -- Financial statements.

 

 

Library Lovers' Day 2021: social media guide

The theme for Library Lovers' Day 2021 was 'Make a date with your library'. The day is an annual opportunity for people to celebrate the valuable role that libraries play in their lives.
 
The purpose of this guide is to assist you to run a successful Library Lovers’ Day social media campaign and to promote your library. Running a successful social media campaign will help you to gain attention for your library services, attract more attendees to your library events and increase overall attention for the LIS industry.

An illegal adoption? — What future for fair use in Australia?

ALIA Information Online 2015 Conference, 2-5 February 2015, Sydney: at the edge.
 
In 2014 the Australian Law Reform Commission (ALRC) recommended the introduction of an American-style fair use, an architecture of non category-based permissible exceptions to the exclusive rights of copyright owners. The conference presentation discusses the ALRC report and possible futures for Australian copyright law.

ALIA Board of Directors: Code of Conduct

This Code of Conduct has been drawn up with regard to the responsibility entrusted to the elected members of the Australian Library and Information Association's (ALIA’s) Board of Directors. It outlines fundamental principles to guide the Board to act in a way that is fair, ethical and beneficial for ALIA and its members. Every member of the Board of Directors is expected to comply with the spirit and letter of this code.
 
The Code of Conduct was endorsed at ALIA Board meeting on 3 July 2017 and will be reviewed every four years.

"Just Dance" with digital literacy

ALIA Information Online 2015 Conference, 2-5 February 2015, Sydney: at the edge.
 
This conference paper shares a new approach to digital literacy development and is divided into four dance elements: Getting Fit for the Dance (digital literacy concept, contexts and definition as used at Deakin University); First steps of the Dance (building liaison librarian capacity; the digitally literate student); Practicing the Dance ( the Case Study and results); and the Dance Finale (Conclusion).

"Just Dance" with digital literacy [slides]

ALIA Information Online 2015 Conference, 2-5 February 2015, Sydney: at the edge.
 
This conference presentation (PowerPoint slides) shares a new approach to digital literacy development and is divided into four dance elements: Getting Fit for the Dance (digital literacy concept, contexts and definition as used at Deakin University); First steps of the Dance (building liaison librarian capacity; the digitally literate student); Practicing the Dance ( the Case Study and results); and the Dance Finale (Conclusion).

"Weather to ebook": ebook space at the Bureau of Meteorology [slides]

ALIA ebook and elending think tank, 15 February 2013 Brisbane
 
In order to understand the concerns of our members, the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) took to the road and organised think tanks, in Brisbane 15 February 2013, Perth 7 March 2013, Melbourne 12 March 2013, Sydney 28 May 2013 and Adelaide 9 July 2013. Our think tanks provided an opportunity for library and information professionals to hear about the issues relating to ebooks and share their experiences and opinions.
 
This presentation (PowerPoint slides) provides an overview of electronic resource content and management at the National Meteorological Library.

APSIG Newsletter No. 93, March 2017

ALIA Asia Pacific Special Interest Group (ALIA APSIG) was a national group that aimed to lead efforts in identifying new sources of support for the development between information professionals in the region, through two-way co-operation. It also aimed to provide a forum for members to discuss regional professional issues and to communicate these to the appropriate forum; hosts public talks relating to relevant issues; and produce a membership newsletter three times per year.

2016 national research infrastructure roadmap capability issues paper

This submission by the Australian Library and Information Assocation (ALIA) is in response to questions posed by the National Research Infrastructure Capability Issues Paper July 2016.
 
The Australian Government requested the development of the 2016 National Research Infrastructure Roadmap to determine Australia's national research infrastructure needs to underpin research efforts over the next decade.

10 steps to a successful lobbying campaign

Contents: Stage 1 - Find out all you can about the issue -- Stage 2 - Script your story -- Stage 3 - Develop key messages -- Stage 4 - Map the audience -- Stage 5 - Build the platform for the call to action -- Stage 6 - Develop materials -- Stage 7 - Develop opportunities -- Stage 8 - Put this all together in a campaign strategy -- Stage 9 - Implementation -- Stage 10 - Monitor and evaluate.

10 ways that libraries power high performance schools

Australian school libraries power high performance government, Catholic and independent schools through providing modern learning environments, digital hubs, developing student research skills, promoting reading for pleasure, providing curriculum support and cybersafety education, celebrating diversity, enabling participation and access, coordinating special programs, and building communities.

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