Advanced Search

ALIA Library

Services for migrants and refugees

When people arrive in Australia, whether through choice or for reasons of hardship, as migrants, international students, refugees or humanitarian entrants, they seek to make a place for themselves and their families in their new communities. They have to set up home, find employment, become familiar with cultural norms that are second nature to Australians but alien to new arrivals, and often their first language is not English.
 
For library users, coming from a country where there is a good public library network, the local library is an obvious place to find essential information, sign up for English language conversation classes, use the public computers, engage with other children and families at storytime. Joining the library is part of the settling in process. For others, coming from countries where there may not be a library network, libraries are an unknown quantity and it can be hard to build up the courage to step over the threshold.
 
Australian libraries recognise the needs and the barriers for migrants and refugees and are working to fulfil the first and break down the latter. This report shares just a few examples of the library projects to be found in different states and territories.

Setting the scene: the ebook landscape [slides]

ALIA ebook and elending think tank, 28 May 2013 Sydney
 
In order to understand the concerns of our members, the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) took to the road and organised think tanks, in Brisbane 15 February 2013, Perth 7 March 2013, Melbourne 12 March 2013, Sydney 28 May 2013 and Adelaide 9 July 2013. Our think tanks provided an opportunity for library and information professionals to hear about the issues relating to ebooks and share their experiences and opinions.
 
This presentation (PowerPoint slides) provides an overview of the issues affecting libraries, both in Australia and globally, in relation to electronic book access and procurement.

Supporting prison libraries: the 2015 ALIA Minimum Standard Guidelines for Library Services to Prisoners

National 2016 Conference, 29 August-2 September 2016 Adelaide: Engage Create Lead.
 
[Peer reviewed] Prison libraries play a pivotal role in serving the educational, recreational and other information needs of prison inmates.  This conference paper discusses the updating of the Mimimum Standard Guidelines for Library Services to Prisoners.  
 
In 2015 the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) established a working group to review and update the Minimum Standard Guidelines for Library Services to Prisoners, first published in 1990.  The guidelines are designed to assist with the planning of new prison libraries as well as in the evaluation and development of existing services. They are based in part on the third edition of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), Guidelines for Library Services to Prisoners (Lehmann & Locke, 2005).  This paper describes the activities of the Working Group and the challenges they faced. It examines how Corrective Services New South Wales has responded to the publication of the Guidelines. Other activities relating to prison libraries that are underway or proposed are discussed and opportunities for further research are suggested.

Supporting prison libraries: the 2015 ALIA Minimum Standard Guidelines for Library Services to Prisoners

National 2016 Conference, 29 August-2 September 2016 Adelaide: Engage Create Lead.
 
Prison libraries play a pivotal role in serving the educational, recreational and other information needs of prison inmates.  This conference presentation (PowerPoint slides) supports the paper which discusses the updating of the Mimimum Standard Guidelines for Library Services to Prisoners.  
 
In 2015 the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) established a working group to review and update the Minimum Standard Guidelines for Library Services to Prisoners, first published in 1990.  The guidelines are designed to assist with the planning of new prison libraries as well as in the evaluation and development of existing services. They are based in part on the third edition of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA), Guidelines for Library Services to Prisoners (Lehmann & Locke, 2005).  This paper describes the activities of the Working Group and the challenges they faced. It examines how Corrective Services New South Wales has responded to the publication of the Guidelines. Other activities relating to prison libraries that are underway or proposed are discussed and opportunities for further research are suggested.

Special libraries directory 2021, 4th edition

ALIA’s Special Libraries Working Group has put together this directory of special libraries to support collaboration. This directory is an update of the 3rd edition published in 2020. It is not a comprehensive listing, but does identify like-minded individuals working in similar situations. The aim is to enable people to share non-competitive information, insight, expertise, ideas and resources; to improve the sense of connectedness in a sector with many one-person libraries, and to strengthen special libraries’ advocacy network.

Submission in response to the Australian Government Senate Inquiry into COVID-19, May 2020

This submission from the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA), the Australian Public Library Alliance (APLA), and the Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL) presents how libraries across the sector have supported their communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.
 
The submission also discusses the issues encountered and provides the following recommendations to the Senate Committee:

  • Ensure clarity of messaging for all libraries
  • Invest in public libraries as a partner in the digital transformation of federal government services
  • Improve access to ebooks and other electronic resources
  • Explore the role of libraries in supporting the federal government's JobMaker scheme

Scholarly communication practices in Humanities and Social Sciences: researchers' attitudes and awareness of Open Access [slides]

Asia-Pacific Library and Information Conference 2018, 30 July - 2 August 2018 Gold Coast: Roar Leap Dare
 
This conference presentation (PowerPoint slides) supports the talk presenting the results of a project exploring the perceptions and practices of researchers working in Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences (HASS) towards open access (OA), based on a study conducted at the University of Technology Sydney, specifically focusing on its institutional repository.
 
The findings highlight some of the barriers and challenges facing open access in HASS, including perception of open access journals, publication pressures, and also the usability of the university repositories. Library staff also identified a lack of awareness about open access among faculty members, and issues relating to how the university communicated with them about OA.
 
The study provides a model for academic libraries in the development of proactive, targeted publications support that responds to researcher needs, which vary between disciplinary cultures. Implications for practice include encouraging a model of embedded librarianship within disciplinary groups in order to understand and customise publications support within disciplines.

Share it: resource sharing futures 2018 conference - summary of outcomes

Share it: Resource Sharing Futures Conference, 10-11 May 2018 Canberra
 
In collaboration with ALIA, Libraries Australia held Share it, a two-day resource sharing futures event. The aim of Share it was to discuss the current Australian resource sharing landscape and issues around the complex world of modern resource sharing. A further aim was to determine whether there is still a need for a national resource sharing service and, if so, to develop a resource sharing road map and action plan for Australia.
 
This document provides a summary of outcomes from the strategic workshop on day 2 of the conference. This invitation only workshop was attended by leaders, thinkers and experts in the Australian resource sharing arena, and provided an opportunity to elevate their thinking around the future of resource sharing.

 

Shandong and South Australia: the power of connection [poster]

Asia-Pacific Library and Information Conference 2018, 30 July - 2 August 2018 Gold Coast: Roar Leap Dare
 
This conference poster presentation accompanied the talk on a partnership between the State Library of South Australia (SLSA) and the Shandong Provincial Library in China.
 

With China being South Australia’s highest export partner, the Government of South Australia has been effectively engaging with China through a long-term partnership with Shandong Province, which celebrated its 30th anniversary in 2016. The Government’s vision is ‘to strengthen the State’s partnership with China and enhance and deepen our long-term engagement in areas encompassing investment, trade and business, education, sport, culture, the arts, sciences, and the exchange of people, skills and ideas’.
 
After hosting two librarians from the Shandong Provincial Library in 2016, the State Library of South Australia (SLSA) further strengthened the relationship and networks with is sister-state province of Shandong, by sending Andrew Piper, Group Manager, Collections and Sharon Morris, Community Learning Educator to Jinan, in April-May 2017. Areas of discussion included the partnering in an exhibition of materials from the Provincial Library’s Ancient Books department scheduled for September 2018 and a return exhibition of SLSA materials; approaches to online engagement with collections and education programs.
 
A large part of the program developed for the SLSA visitors was the introduction to the culture of the people of Shandong along with visits to significant sites discussions, lectures and library tours.

 

Special libraries directory 2021, 5th edition

ALIA’s Special Libraries Working Group has put together this directory of special libraries to support collaboration. The directory is not a comprehensive listing, but it does identify like-minded individuals working in similar situations. The aim is to enable people to share non-competitive information, insight, expertise, ideas and resources; to improve the sense of connectedness in a sector with many one-person libraries, and to strengthen special libraries’ advocacy network. 
 
This directory is an update of the 4th edition published in early 2021.

Reinventing support for medical students: LibGuides as a pedagogical tool

Asia-Pacific Library and Information Conference 2018, 30 July - 2 August 2018 Gold Coast: Roar Leap Dare
 
This conference paper discusses the challenge in ensuring students have access to library based learning resources at their point of need; whilst also having skills and background to be able to correctly use the resources.
 
ANU Library is one Library made up of five specialised branches, including the Hancock Library. Senior Information Staff from the Hancock Library, that are subject contacts for medical sciences, have traditionally offered hands on information literacy sessions on medical resources to ANU medical students. This has been complemented by a standard LibGuide. With multiple teaching locations throughout the ACT, south-east NSW and Northern Territory, there is a significant challenge in ensuring students have access to library based learning resources at their point of need; whilst also having skills and background to be able to correctly use the resources. Hancock Library staff undertook a systematic approach to completely reinvent Medicine LibGuide, to develop a pedagogically sound LibGuide for the needs of medical students.

 

Reinventing support for medical students: LibGuides as a pedagogical tool [slides]

Asia-Pacific Library and Information Conference 2018, 30 July - 2 August 2018 Gold Coast: Roar Leap Dare
 
This conference presentation (PowerPoint slides) supports the paper which discusses the challenge in ensuring students have access to library based learning resources at their point of need; whilst also having skills and background to be able to correctly use the resources.
 
ANU Library is one Library made up of five specialised branches, including the Hancock Library. Senior Information Staff from the Hancock Library, that are subject contacts for medical sciences, have traditionally offered hands on information literacy sessions on medical resources to ANU medical students. This has been complemented by a standard LibGuide. With multiple teaching locations throughout the ACT, south-east NSW and Northern Territory, there is a significant challenge in ensuring students have access to library based learning resources at their point of need; whilst also having skills and background to be able to correctly use the resources. Hancock Library staff undertook a systematic approach to completely reinvent Medicine LibGuide, to develop a pedagogically sound LibGuide for the needs of medical students.

 

Re imagining libraries

ALIA National 2014 Conference, 15-19 September 2014 Melbourne : together we are stronger
This conference presentation explores how the role of libraries have long been custodians of ‘more than just books’.  For NSLA libraries, the personal stories collected in our diaries, correspondence, photographs, artworks and realia are some of our most precious items.  The rapid increase in digitally-created material has posed many problems, but also offered many opportunities, for libraries. 
The traditional linear structure of item-donor-library is now a more complex structure, where everyone is a potential creator and curator.  In recent years, libraries have been grappling to find the best and most efficient way of acquiring and preserving these new materials, from these new creators.  Serena Coates will give a summary of the recent efforts by NSLA (National and State Libraries Australasia) to address the issues associated with digital collecting, and Sarah Slade will provide a summary of the efforts of NSLA’s Digital Preservation Project.

Re-engineering our role: A case study of a corporate library at the cutting edge

ALIA Information Online 2015 Conference, 2-5 February 2015, Sydney: at the edge.
 
Abstract:
 
Corporate librarians need to be relevant to the needs of the business in which they operate. In tough times, the corporate library is often the first to go, but how did this geographically disparate team get ahead of the game and become central to plans of the organisation? This paper will explore the journey that this team undertook, to be an integral part of the business, as well as developing their professional skills at the same time.
 
The paper will explore the methods undertaken to develop a cutting edge regional corporate library team and to develop highly skilled professionals, beyond what their training gave them. This will include providing an overview of the diverse business and the culture of the company. The paper will form a case study and focus on practical examples, including exposure and visibility as a form of marketing, business development research and current awareness, the design and delivery of a comprehensive regional training program, blurring of roles and moving into the corporate knowledge space and engagement with research as a means of innovation. It will also include how activity based working was trialled – to embed the team within the business, as well as having an input into the re-design of the physical space.
 
Diversification, investment from the leadership and a consultancy approach put the team on the road to success. This paper will look at the future of the information professional and library service in the corporate sector, as well as the new skills and approaches that every corporate librarian should consider to ensure relevancy and ultimately survival.

Re-engineering our role: A case study of a corporate library at the cutting edge [slides]

ALIA Information Online 2015 Conference, 2-5 February 2015, Sydney: at the edge.
 
This conference presentation (PowerPoint slides) looks at the future of the information professional and library service in the corporate sector, as well as the new skills and approaches that every corporate librarian should consider to ensure relevancy and ultimately survival. Diversification, investment from the leadership and a consultancy approach put the team on the road to success.

Research Data Management support: sharing our experiences

ALIA National 2016 Conference 29 August-2 September 2016 Adelaide: Engage Create Lead
 
This conference presentation (PowerPoint slides) supports the paper which explores the place of Research Data Management (RDM) support services as an extension of the academic librarian's role. The presenters anticipate that RDM support will become increasingly important in an ever-more data-driven research environment, and share the experiences of three South Australian university libraries in providing RDM, including the skillsets developed and lessons learned. 

Reading Hour Report 2016

The Reading Hour is one of the most celebrated annual reading initiatives in Australia, and supports individuals, families and communities to discover and rediscover the joy of reading. The Reading Hour emerged from the National Year of Reading 2012, and is an ongoing campaign from Love2Read, funded by the ALIA Australian Public Library Alliance and in partnership with the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund.
 

Reading Hour Report 2015

The Reading Hour is one of the most celebrated annual reading initiatives in Australia, and supports individuals, families and communities to discover and rediscover the joy of reading. The Reading Hour emerged from the National Year of Reading 2012, and is an ongoing campaign from Love2Read, funded by the ALIA Australian Public Library Alliance and in partnership with the Copyright Agency Cultural Fund.
 

Reading engagement through reading comprehension [slides]

ALIA Schools Professional Development Seminar, 10 August 2019 Melbourne: Reading for Everyone
 
This presentation (PowerPoint slides) accompanied the keynote address 'Reading intervention' which explored why literacy intervention is crucial to students’ learning success, how to assess the learning needs of students, how intervention in reading is part of the role of the school library and identify ways the teacher librarian can contribute to being part of this program.

Pages