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ALIA national library and information technicians' symposium 2015: conference program

National Library and Information Technicians' Symposium 2 - 4 September 2015: Hobart, Tasmania. 
 
Theme: RIGHT HERE – RIGHT NOW: It’s a Devil of a time in libraries.
 
Delivering library services in a technology connected world, providing services to a society with a ‘Want it here – Need it now’ expectation.
 
What are the challenges for the Library Technician in ensuring that their library remains relevant and viable in an age of ever changing technology, expectations and the priorities of their Institutions?
 
Library Technicians have an opportunity to play key roles in maintaining the relevancy of their institutional library, as well as assisting in its growth and evolution in an ever changing world.
 
The symposium will provide an opportunity for library technicians from around Australia to meet together in the formal setting of a structured program, to hear prominent members of the profession, as well as their peers, speak and debate contemporary issues relating to the profession, professionalism and library work in general. In addition, there will be many opportunities for networking including the symposium dinner, opening and closing events and daily breaks as well as the opportunity for networking at the ad hoc gatherings that this event supports and encourages.

An enterprise approach to research outputs collection, management and reporting at the University of South Australia: collaborating to innovate

ALIA Information Online 2017 Conference, 13-17 February 2017 Sydney: Data Information Knowledge
 
[Peer reviewed] This conference paper discusses a project by the University of South Australia to develop a system to manage research ouputs.
 
Abstract: The challenge of ensuring that research outputs are captured in a timely manner, academics are not frustrated with administrative processes and using powerful tools such as ORCiD to their full advantage is one faced by all universities. Coupled with senior managers’ increasing information needs to use research outputs data to answer key questions such as ‘who should we be collaborating with?’ adds additional pressure for streamlined whole-of-university processes, often when different areas work at cross-purposes. Through an intentional ‘one team’ collaboration between Library, Business Intelligence and Planning, Information Strategy and Technology Services, Research and Innovation Services, and Human Resources teams, UniSA has managed to support schools and academics to deliver enhanced end‐user services and to introduce efficiencies across the organisation with the support of the Deputy Vice Chancellor: Research and Innovation. The benefits of this approach have led to the following in a time period of only 18 months:
 

  • the creation of the Collection of Research Outputs (CRO) online submissions and management system for all UniSA research outputs including journal articles, books and book chapters, conference papers, reports, patents, creative works, and Higher Degree and Masters by Research theses. CRO is currently harvesting 70% of all journal articles
  • widespread adoption of ORCiDs
  • output metadata being sufficiently complete and of high quality to automatically populate new design publicly-available staff home pages
  • significantly increased compliance with UniSA’s Open Access Policy which has required Library staff to develop new workflows to support post‐print lodgement into the University’s institutional Research Outputs Repository (ROR)
  • a more complete and up to date source of data to support Deputy Vice Chancellor: Research and Innovation’s desire to introduce measures of research productivity, which in some cases, will report and benchmark performance on outputs not necessarily included in statutory reporting requirements
  • integration of citation counts and Altmetrics, and affiliation and collaboration metadata into staff home pages, staff performance reports and ROR pages.

 
The project leveraged existing enterprise systems including Appian business process management workflow software, the Alma library management solution and vendor APIs. The system delivers academics automated weekly notifications of new research outputs harvested from Scopus and Web of Science. Academics then either claim or reject the output and upload the post-print where applicable. Academics are also able to use a DOI lookup or manually submit publication details. The development of the new Repository discovery interface was informed by stakeholders and the display also includes additional citation details, funding, and linked research datasets. A comprehensive whole‐of‐university communications plan (including support resources) was executed with capability building sessions delivered by Library and other staff. The system has been in operation since August 2015 and initial uptake has exceeded expectations with academics quickly adapting to and engaging with the new process. Typically, academics claim outputs within a week of notification and the average time for a researcher to review and finalise an output is under five minutes. 

 

A Devil of a Challenge – Introduction of RFID Technology

Abstract:
 
Some would say living in North Queensland with 90% humidity, raging cyclones, swimming with deadly jellyfish and crocodiles is challenging, yet this is nothing compared to leading staff through major cultural, operational and organisational change.
 
CityLibraries Townsville made the decision in 2012 to join the 170+ libraries across Australia and New Zealand to liberate ourselves from out dated technology and implement RFID. Evolving with the times staff were destined for a 100% self-service model accompanied by a transitional period of uncertainty and culture shock. What did this mean for us? A bumpy road where the leadership team worked tirelessly to support library staff in the movement from a role defined by transactions to a role centred on interactions with customers.
 
How did we manage and cope with this? Forget the managers’ perspective, this paper will tell you what it’s really like leading front line staff through the challenging and opportunistic transformation whilst keeping morale high and the library functioning beyond its current capability. For the customers it would be a game changer, with a proven record for enhancing the service to maximise productivity gains resulting in staff having time to assist with the rapid growth in demand for digital technology and the delivery of more services and programs to the community. Leading by example required each and every one of us to commit to new behaviours and new habits for the transition to 100% self-service. As Team Leaders, we were the first port of call for concerns from the front line staff proving that we as Library and Information Technicians more than ever must be the “devil” to tame the beasts and lead staff through an ever changing and demanding world in libraries.

A brave experiment in community-led programming [slides]

ALIA New Librarians' Symposium 9 (NLS9), 5-7 July 2019 Adelaide: collaborate deviate innovate
 
This presentation (PowerPoint slides) supported the talk on the program called the 'Cultural Forum'. The program started as a brave experiment (granted support on a 6 month trial-basis) and evolved across a 12 month period to become a radical method for community led programs in Melbourne. Yarra Libraries worked with not-for-profit organisations to build panels and address topical issues from the Stolen Generations to Manus Island and detainment.

An enterprise approach to research outputs collection, management and reporting at the University of South Australia: collaborating to innovate [slides]

ALIA Information Online 2017 Conference, 13-17 February 2017 Sydney: Data Information Knowledge
 
[Peer reviewed] This conference presentation (PowerPoint slides) supports the paper which discusses a project by the University of South Australia to develop a system to manage research ouputs.
 
Abstract: The challenge of ensuring that research outputs are captured in a timely manner, academics are not frustrated with administrative processes and using powerful tools such as ORCiD to their full advantage is one faced by all universities. Coupled with senior managers’ increasing information needs to use research outputs data to answer key questions such as ‘who should we be collaborating with?’ adds additional pressure for streamlined whole-of-university processes, often when different areas work at cross-purposes. Through an intentional ‘one team’ collaboration between Library, Business Intelligence and Planning, Information Strategy and Technology Services, Research and Innovation Services, and Human Resources teams, UniSA has managed to support schools and academics to deliver enhanced end‐user services and to introduce efficiencies across the organisation with the support of the Deputy Vice Chancellor: Research and Innovation. The benefits of this approach have led to the following in a time period of only 18 months:
 

  • the creation of the Collection of Research Outputs (CRO) online submissions and management system for all UniSA research outputs including journal articles, books and book chapters, conference papers, reports, patents, creative works, and Higher Degree and Masters by Research theses. CRO is currently harvesting 70% of all journal articles
  • widespread adoption of ORCiDs
  • output metadata being sufficiently complete and of high quality to automatically populate new design publicly-available staff home pages
  • significantly increased compliance with UniSA’s Open Access Policy which has required Library staff to develop new workflows to support post‐print lodgement into the University’s institutional Research Outputs Repository (ROR)
  • a more complete and up to date source of data to support Deputy Vice Chancellor: Research and Innovation’s desire to introduce measures of research productivity, which in some cases, will report and benchmark performance on outputs not necessarily included in statutory reporting requirements
  • integration of citation counts and Altmetrics, and affiliation and collaboration metadata into staff home pages, staff performance reports and ROR pages.

 
The project leveraged existing enterprise systems including Appian business process management workflow software, the Alma library management solution and vendor APIs. The system delivers academics automated weekly notifications of new research outputs harvested from Scopus and Web of Science. Academics then either claim or reject the output and upload the post-print where applicable. Academics are also able to use a DOI lookup or manually submit publication details. The development of the new Repository discovery interface was informed by stakeholders and the display also includes additional citation details, funding, and linked research datasets. A comprehensive whole‐of‐university communications plan (including support resources) was executed with capability building sessions delivered by Library and other staff. The system has been in operation since August 2015 and initial uptake has exceeded expectations with academics quickly adapting to and engaging with the new process. Typically, academics claim outputs within a week of notification and the average time for a researcher to review and finalise an output is under five minutes. 

 

A Devil of a Challenge – Introduction of RFID Technology [slides]

Abstract:
 
Some would say living in North Queensland with 90% humidity, raging cyclones, swimming with deadly jellyfish and crocodiles is challenging, yet this is nothing compared to leading staff through major cultural, operational and organisational change.
 
CityLibraries Townsville made the decision in 2012 to join the 170+ libraries across Australia and New Zealand to liberate ourselves from out dated technology and implement RFID. Evolving with the times staff were destined for a 100% self-service model accompanied by a transitional period of uncertainty and culture shock. What did this mean for us? A bumpy road where the leadership team worked tirelessly to support library staff in the movement from a role defined by transactions to a role centred on interactions with customers.
 
How did we manage and cope with this? Forget the managers’ perspective, this paper will tell you what it’s really like leading front line staff through the challenging and opportunistic transformation whilst keeping morale high and the library functioning beyond its current capability. For the customers it would be a game changer, with a proven record for enhancing the service to maximise productivity gains resulting in staff having time to assist with the rapid growth in demand for digital technology and the delivery of more services and programs to the community. Leading by example required each and every one of us to commit to new behaviours and new habits for the transition to 100% self-service. As Team Leaders, we were the first port of call for concerns from the front line staff proving that we as Library and Information Technicians more than ever must be the “devil” to tame the beasts and lead staff through an ever changing and demanding world in libraries.

A perfect fit! Tailoring IT teaching to your community

Abstract:
Public libraries today face the challenge of educating and bridging the knowledge gaps of those patrons in their communities who have limited experience with information technology, and few related skills. Connecting people with information, fostering digital skills in the community, and enabling participation in online environments have become core functions of the library. These functions, which are lacking in other public and private spaces, are increasingly relied upon by library users to socialise, develop themselves and conduct their business.
 
A lack of basic IT skills and familiarities can result in frustration, depression and feelings of helplessness with respect to the use of computers. At Cambridge Library, the Digital Services Team (two library technicians and me) first provided small group classes teaching library clients basic computer skills. On review it became apparent that the students attending had such diverse needs that a group teaching program was no longer the most effective option. To provide a better service to library clients, we developed a specialised IT teaching program in which we tailor one on one classes to each individual's needs.
 
My paper will outline why these tailored IT teaching classes can be the best option for community libraries, the strategies our team used to research, structure and implement our teaching program, and how the team manages and resources the program on a day-to-day basis. The paper will provide a model, or blueprint for the design and implementation of such a program in other public libraries.

A perfect fit! Tailoring IT teaching to your community [slides]

Abstract:
Public libraries today face the challenge of educating and bridging the knowledge gaps of those patrons in their communities who have limited experience with information technology, and few related skills. Connecting people with information, fostering digital skills in the community, and enabling participation in online environments have become core functions of the library. These functions, which are lacking in other public and private spaces, are increasingly relied upon by library users to socialise, develop themselves and conduct their business.
 
A lack of basic IT skills and familiarities can result in frustration, depression and feelings of helplessness with respect to the use of computers. At Cambridge Library, the Digital Services Team (two library technicians and me) first provided small group classes teaching library clients basic computer skills. On review it became apparent that the students attending had such diverse needs that a group teaching program was no longer the most effective option. To provide a better service to library clients, we developed a specialised IT teaching program in which we tailor one on one classes to each individual's needs.
 
My paper will outline why these tailored IT teaching classes can be the best option for community libraries, the strategies our team used to research, structure and implement our teaching program, and how the team manages and resources the program on a day-to-day basis. The paper will provide a model, or blueprint for the design and implementation of such a program in other public libraries.

ALIA and international relations statement

The Australian library and information profession is committed to increasing the Australian Library and Information Association’s presence in the global library community, to providing leadership through ALIA’s expertise and to promoting greater understanding of international librarianship and library issues in the global information environment.
 
Adopted 1997. Amended 2001. Reviewed 2009. Amended 2018. Superceded by "ALIA international relations statement" (2022).

Alohamora: unlocking the library with escape rooms [slides]

National Library and Information Technicians' Symposium, 13-15 November 2019 Melbourne: Discover, Diversify, Dive In
 
This presentation (PowerPoint slides) accompanied the symposium workshop on planning and implementing escape rooms in public libraries.
 
Session description: Google ‘escape rooms’ in Melbourne and you get multiple hits for various companies offering an escape room experience. They cover themes of prison breaks to vampires to haunted houses and everything else in between. If you can think it, there probably is an escape room using that theme. There is no doubt they are popular. But can they be implemented in a library? After all, an escape room is usually a single or even multiple rooms all set up with clues and puzzles for the participants to work their way through to the exit. Given they're usually custom built rooms that are more or less a permanent fixture of the building they are in, is it even possible to do this in a public library?
 
Using experience in running a Harry Potter themed escape room at Casey Cardinia Libraries, the process to creating and running an escape room (Harry Potter themed or otherwise) within the library setting will be discussed. We will go through the steps from initial planning to implementation, and examples from the CCL escape room will be presented. Participants will be given the opportunity to try out some of the clues as well start the process of creating an escape room with the group, from initial concept to realisation.

 

ALIA National Library and Information Technicians' Symposium 2017: Terms and conditions

ALIA National Library and Information Technicians' Symposium was held 27-29 September 2017 at the Australian Catholic University, North Sydney. This symposium provided an opportunity for library technicians from around Australia to meet together in the formal setting of a structured program, to hear prominent members of the profession, as well as their peers, speak and debate contemporary issues relating to the profession, professionalism and library work in general. In addition, there will be many opportunities for networking including the symposium dinner, opening and closing events and daily breaks as well as the opportunity for networking at the ad hoc gatherings that this event supports and encourages.
This document provides terms and conditions relating to registration, liability, insurance, privacy, photography and payment.

ALIA submission in response to the Tune Review of the National Archives of Australia, June 2019

The Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) asks the Tune Review panel to acknowledge the broader role of the National Archives of Australia (NAA), in relation to audience engagement, in the context of the information management and GLAM sectors, and with reference to the changing role of archives in the developed nations.
 
We also ask the panel to consider the impact of an injection of funding specifically for digital transformation, making priority records accessible to users online in a reasonable timeframe, and meeting the 2025 deadline for audio visual (AV) materials which may not otherwise survive in a usable condition.

ALIA submission in response to the Data Sharing and Release Legislative Reforms Discussion Paper, October 2019

The Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) has been an active participant in the discussions around the proposed Data Sharing and Release Legislation, and we would like to commend the Office of the National Data Commissioner on the extent and depth of the consultation process. We understand that there is further work to be undertaken and welcome the opportunity to continue to be involved and to highlight the evolving role of library and information professionals, making data Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable (the FAIR principles).

ALIA submission in response to the review of the ANZ Standard Research Classification, May 2019

On behalf of our members, representing library and information professionals, libraries and information services, academics, researchers, research practitioners and the Library and Information Science (LIS) community Australia-wide, the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) welcomes the opportunity to provide a response to the ANZ Standard Research Classification review. For LIS, we recommend the relocation and renaming of one FoR (080702), the renaming of four FoR (080701, 080704, 080706 and 080708) and the addition of two new FoR (080710 and 080711). We would be pleased to be involved in further discussions about the review as required by the review board.

ALIA TAFE library survey 2016

There are 246 TAFE libraries in Australia, supporting VET students in every State and Territory. At the beginning of 2016, ALIA's Vocational Education and Training Libraries Advisory Committee (VLAC) sought feedback about how changes in structure and funding have affected TAFE libraries and the library and information professionals who run them.
 
TAFE libraries were asked to complete an online questionnaire with 32 questions relating to changes in collection format, staffing, funding, space and the size of population served. The survey ran from 1 to 25 February 2016.

ALIA submission in response to the Meeting of Cultural Ministers National Arts and Disability Strategy Discussion Paper, December 2018

The Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) welcomes the opportunity to respond to the National Arts and Disability Strategy discussion paper on behalf of our Members. It is good to see within the document the acknowledgement of libraries as community infrastructure promoting access to the arts for everyone. Public libraries across Australia are transforming their facilities, programs, services, technologies and staff skills to meet the challenges of our increasingly digital society, all the while ensuring that access is maintained and wherever possible improved, for people living with disability.

ALIA's relationships with overseas library associations policy statement

The Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) supports library associations around the world. Support for international library associations will be consistent with ALIA’s core values policy statement.
 
ALIA’s strong focus is associations in developing nations within the region and areas where ALIA has policy expertise and knowledge. Priority for support of overseas libraries and library associations is given to those from South East Asian, Pacific and Oceania countries. ALIA may also consider entering into bilateral or multi party relationships of mutual benefit through Memoranda of Understanding (MOU) with other like-minded international associations. The MOU will identify the working relationships, shared interests and common understanding that exist between collaborating associations.
 
March 2013. Amended 2018. Superceded by "ALIA international relations statement" (2022).

ALIA special libraries survey: snapshot of the survey findings

In 2010 the ALIA Special Library Advisory Committee (SLAC) determined to undertake a statistical study of special libraries in Australia. The purpose of the study was to enable ALIA, special libraries members and employers (management) to gain a better understanding of the current state of specialist information services in Australia.
 
This document provides an overview of the ALIA special libraries survey report findings.

ALCC submission to the Senate Committee reviewing the Copyright Amendment (Service Providers) Bill 2017, February 2018

The Australian Libraries Copyright Committee (ALCC) welcomes current changes to the Bill as an initial step in improving Australia's safe harbour arrangements, but encourage further amendments to ensure that all local online service providers have the same legal certainty. The amendments proposed will provide significant benefits to Australia's library and archive community. They will lower the risk involved in digital engagement projects, and enable our members to more confidently make use of the latest technologies and tools. ALCC also maintains its support for the further extension of the copyright safe harbours to all online service providers, including commercial platforms.
 

ALIA special libraries survey: report snapshot

In 2010 the ALIA Special Library Advisory Committee (SLAC) determined to undertake a statistical study of special libraries in Australia. The purpose of the study was to enable ALIA, special libraries members and employers (management) to gain a better understanding of the current state of specialist information services in Australia.
 
This document provides a brief profile of Australian special librarian survey respondents.

Australian Digital Alliance letter in relation to safe harbour scheme extension, February 2016

The Australian Digital Alliance (ADA) welcomes changes to the Copyright Amendment (Disability Access and Other Measures) Bill. These reforms are essential to foster the development of Australia’s digital economy and ensure all Australians share in its benefits. We welcome and support the Bill’s introduction into Parliament at the earliest opportunity this year.

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