Advanced Search

ALIA Library

Sustainable Development Goals: Stretch targets baseline report March 2023 update

10 Sustainable Development Goal stretch targets are proposed for libraries in Australia from 2020-2030. Targets address literacy; access to knowledge; equitable access; culture and heritage; sustainable communities; contribution to health and wellbeing; diversity and gender equality; lifelong learning; and global citizenship. 
 
The report tracks the current status of lead agencies against the SDG stretch targets in March 2023. 

Submission to Australian Universities Accord Discussion Paper

ALIA’s submission to the Australian Universities Accord Discussion Paper proposes five overarching recommendations to inform the long-term plan for Australia’s higher education sector. Recommendations include: reduction of fees for Commonwealth supported places for library and information studies; support for smaller and niche industry courses; recognition of industry accreditation; support for open educational resources and open scholarship; and recognition and adequate resouricing for the work of university libraries, archives and other information services. 

Sustainable, continuous improvement in online academic and information literacy support

Asia-Pacific Library and Information Conference 2018, 30 July - 2 August 2018 Gold Coast: Roar Leap Dare
 
[Peer reviewed] This conference paper builds on previous research that evaluated the impact of an embedded online academic and information literacy module into the Learning and Management System (LMS) of a first year university business course. The research findings concluded:
 
“this resource contributed to student success, and that staff and student satisfaction with the resource contributed to increased confidence with student academic skills and information literacy in respect to their assignment task. Assessing the impact of the online resource on student success has helped to demonstrate the value of the library at Griffith University to the wider community” (Rae & Hunn. 2015 p. 1)
 
Since the original module was created and embedded into the LMS for a single course in 2014, the provision of these individual, assessment specific, online modules has expanded into all levels of Business School undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Academic interest has piqued due to the movement into blended learning offerings at Griffith University demanding equitable access to academic and information literacy support.  Data was gathered over the years 2014 to 2017 on unique users and page views of the modules. Usage has leaped from 4,442 page visits by 910 unique users in one course in 2014, to 271,556 page visits by 12,456 unique users in 45 different courses in 2017. 
 
Whilst the learning analytics of the data gathered continues to indicate positive impact on students and so supports the continued and increased provision of these resources, other issues around sustainability have arisen and need to be addressed. The aim of this paper is to examine how the use of an e-learning maturity model can help  address issues of sustainability  that arise as part of supporting an online approach to academic and information literacy support. 

Sustainable, continuous improvement in online academic and information literacy support [slides]

Asia-Pacific Library and Information Conference 2018, 30 July - 2 August 2018 Gold Coast: Roar Leap Dare
 
This conference presentation (PowerPoint slides) supports the paper which builds on previous research that evaluated the impact of an embedded online academic and information literacy module into the Learning and Management System (LMS) of a first year university business course. The research findings concluded:
 
“this resource contributed to student success, and that staff and student satisfaction with the resource contributed to increased confidence with student academic skills and information literacy in respect to their assignment task. Assessing the impact of the online resource on student success has helped to demonstrate the value of the library at Griffith University to the wider community” (Rae & Hunn. 2015 p. 1)
 
Since the original module was created and embedded into the LMS for a single course in 2014, the provision of these individual, assessment specific, online modules has expanded into all levels of Business School undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Academic interest has piqued due to the movement into blended learning offerings at Griffith University demanding equitable access to academic and information literacy support.  Data was gathered over the years 2014 to 2017 on unique users and page views of the modules. Usage has leaped from 4,442 page visits by 910 unique users in one course in 2014, to 271,556 page visits by 12,456 unique users in 45 different courses in 2017. 
 
Whilst the learning analytics of the data gathered continues to indicate positive impact on students and so supports the continued and increased provision of these resources, other issues around sustainability have arisen and need to be addressed. The aim of this paper is to examine how the use of an e-learning maturity model can help  address issues of sustainability  that arise as part of supporting an online approach to academic and information literacy support. 

Spanning the gap using DigiLabs

National Library and Information Technicians Symposium, 27-29 September 2017 North Sydney: bridge to knowledge
 
This conference paper discusses how TasTAFE Libraries, by establishing DigiLabs, have aimed to concentrate on digital literacy skill sets with a focus on areas such as: cloud computing, coding using robotics, social media, virtual reality, new technologies (how to use a 3D printer and scanner), and developing an ICT mindset. The DigiLabs were developed to provide not only access to new technologies but the physical space to learn those technologies.
 

Spanning the gap using DigiLabs [slides]

National Library and Information Technicians Symposium, 27-29 September 2017 North Sydney: bridge to knowledge
 
This conference presentation (PowerPoint slides) supports the paper which discusses how TasTAFE Libraries, by establishing DigiLabs, have aimed to concentrate on digital literacy skill sets with a focus on areas such as: cloud computing, coding using robotics, social media, virtual reality, new technologies (how to use a 3D printer and scanner), and developing an ICT mindset. The DigiLabs were developed to provide not only access to new technologies but the physical space to learn those technologies.
 

Submission to the Second National Action Plan under the National Disaster Risk Reduction Framework

This submission by ALIA is to inform the Second National Action Plan under the National Disaster Risk Reduction Framework. The submission provides responses to Discussion Questions three and five as follows: outline the enablers that are fundamental to ALIA's efforts in reducing disaster risks (Q3); identify gaps that impede efforts to reduce disaster risks (Q3); highlight an opportunity to develop and deliver a collections disaster training course (Q5).

Submission to the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia Decadal Plan for Social Science Research Infrastructure

A joint submission from the Australian Library and Information Association, Council of Australian University Librarians, National and State Libraries Australasia, Australian Society of Archivists and the Council of Australasian Archives and Records Authorities to the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia Decadal Plan for Social Science Research Infrastructure Discussion Paper.
The submission focuses on three principle areas: asses, systems and skills and ethics. 

Submission from the library and information sector to the Department of Home Affairs Multicultural Framework Review

This submission from the library and informatoin sector to the Department of Home Affairs Multicultural Framemwork Review is jointly made by the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA), CAVAL, and the ALIA Multicultural special interest group.
This submission outlines the role that libraries play supporting multicultural communities to ensure that they are visible and understood in further policy development. The submission is structured in the following sections: collections, cultural and language programs, community needs, belonging and outreach, technology and digital citizenship, and workforce and skills. We look forward to opportunities to continue discussions with the Department of Home Affairs on how we can work together to ensure that libraries and information services support, celebrate, and reflect the diversity of voices and experiences in this country.

Submission on the Australian National Persistent Identifier (PID) Strategy from the Australian Library and Information Association

This submission responds to the Australian Research Data Commons (ARDC) Australian National Persistent Identifier (PID) draft strategy. The Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) including ALIA Health Libraries Australia (ALIA HLA) congratulate the ARDC for their excellent work on the Australian National Persistent Identifier (PID) draft strategy. ALIA sees significant potential for the PID strategy to support research and research reporting across different types of organisations and sectors. The submission takes the opportunity to highlight areas where the consistent use of PIDs, including Research Organisation Registry (RORs) would assist in research data collection across the health sector in particluar, and highlight our support of the FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable) and CARE Principles for Indigenous Data Sovereignty (Collective benefit, Authority to control, Responsibility, Ethics) being embedded in further development of the PID strategy. 

Special libraries directory 2019-2020, 1st edition

ALIA’s Special Libraries Working Group has put together this directory of special libraries to support collaboration. The directory is not a comprehensive listing, but it does identify like-minded individuals working in similar situations. The aim is to enable people to share non-competitive information, insight, expertise, ideas and resources; to improve the sense of connectedness in a sector with many one-person libraries, and to strengthen special libraries’ advocacy network.

Sustainable Development Goals: Stretch Targets for Australian Libraries 2020-2030

10 Sustainable Development Goal stretch targets are proposed for libraries in Australia from 2020-2030, following a period of refinement from September 2019. Targets address literacy; access to knowledge; equitable access; culture and heritage; sustainable communities; contribution to health and wellbeing; diversity and gender equality; lifelong learning; and global citizenship. The report outlines activities and measurements to allow progress to be tracked. 

Same truth, different reality: information literacy practices in vocational and vocational/higher education TAFE libraries

ALIA National 2014 Conference, 15-19 September 2014 Melbourne : together we are stronger

The aim of this conference paper is to examine the differences in information literacy (IL) practices for VET students from TAFE libraries across Vocational only and Vocational and Higher Education delivering, TAFE institutes.

It will examine the content, delivery methods and barriers of IL practices across these two types of TAFE institution with a view to identify the likely differences facing IL programs in different types of TAFE library, and to provide suggestions on how best to tailor the IL practices to suit the particular student and teacher cohort.

Submission in response to the Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications Regional Telecommunications Review

The Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) and ALIA Australian Public Library Alliance (APLA) respond to the Regional Telecommunications Review issues paper drafted by the Australian Federal Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Communications.
ALIA and APLA support equality of access to the benefits arising from our increasingly digital society and view public libraries as having an important role in bridging the gap for those who don’t have the skills, knowledge, money, devices or high speed connection to be regular and confident users of the internet.
 
ALIA and APLA ask the Regional Telecommunications Review committee to reference the role and value of the public library network in its report and to encourage federal government, telecommunications industry actors and other stakeholders to approach libraries, through councils, as key delivery partners in new initiatives in this space.

Support for the Productivity Commission's fair use recommendation

The Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) is a signatory on a letter to the Minister for Communications and the Arts, Senator Mitch Fifield, expressing strong support for the Productivity Commission's recommendation that Australia should introduce a fair use exception into the Copyright Act 1968.
 
The letter is signed by 47 stakeholders who believe a fair use exception is a critical reform to ensure that the Australian economy is best placed for a strong digital future.
 
The benefits that fair use reform would provide for libraries, and other cultural institutions, are significant. The reform would allow them to open up collections and digitise historical works where copyright owners cannot be found. Australians could take advantage of this cultural heritage to use these work in projects from family histories to memes.

 

Special resolutions explanatory statement, ALIA 26th Annual General Meeting 21 May 2014

Explanatory statement for special resolutions considered at the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) 26th Annual General Meeting held on 21 May 2014 at ALIA House, Canberra.
Appendix includes the ALIA Constitution effective to 30 November 2006 with the proposed amendments marked.
The changes aim to ensure the Constitution reflects a modern Association; provides greater efficiency and flexibility, and acknowledges the expanding role of technology.
The changes include the introduction of online voting options at the AGM; the reduction of the AGM quorum from 21 to 11; the removal of the requirement for a Director representing institutional members (all Directors act on behalf of personal and institutional members); and a change of title from Executive Director to Chief Executive Officer. It is proposed that the National Advisory Congress provisions be incorporated into the Association by-laws instead of the constitution, but there are no plans to discontinue the annual round of member gatherings. Further amendments tidy up the wording of the constitution, for example, Secretary becomes Company Secretary.

School librarians using digital technologies

ALIA National 2014 Conference, 15-19 September 2014 Melbourne : together we are stronger
Not only will this conference presentation make theoretical connections between schools, libraries, technology and how integral teacher-librarians are to this process; but it will also make strong links between school and public libraries and the opportunities that exist for ongoing collaboration, with the primary aim of establishing consistent messaging about knowledge-sharing and positive use of digital technologies.
Educating school communities on cybersafety and digital literacy is now a very important part of the school’s remit in the digital era, and teacher-librarians are integral to this process – many of whom are drivers of digital innovation and collaboration within schools.  
 

Special resolutions explanatory statement, ALIA 29th Annual General Meeting 17 May 2017

Explanatory statement for special resolutions considered at the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) 29th Annual General Meeting held on 17 May 2017 at ALIA House, Canberra.
The ALIA Board proposed adding the term 'environment' to the first object of the Constitution and the inclusion of an additional object to endorse the principles of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights - Article 19 and the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals in response to the many challenges faced by the world today and into the future.

Submission in response to the Australian Government review of Australian classification regulation, February 2020

The Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) and our library members welcome the opportunity, through the review of Australian classification regulation, to address a problem which has been an issue for libraries for a number of years, and which has now reached a critical point. 
 
Our specific interest is in ‘Part 2: Modernising classification legislation, item 6’, and the question: ‘Consistent with the current broadcasting model, could all classifiable content be classified by industry, either using Government-approved classification tools or trained staff classifiers, with oversight by a single Government regulator?’ Related to this is our response to part 8 and the question: ‘Is the current co-operative scheme between the Australian Government and the states and territories fit for purpose in a modern content environment?’
 
We look forward to further involvement as the consultation moves into the next phase and we hope we can achieve legislative change which will benefit communities with diverse populations across Australia.

 

Submission in response to the revision of the Implementation Plan for the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2013-2023, February 2020

The Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) is supportive of the proposed implementation plan’s structure, vision, foundations and focus areas. In summary:

  • We applaud that cultural and social determinants are the foundations for the plan’s structure.
  • We fully support the flexible structure of the implementation plan, in particular that it allows for local response and input, which mirrors our own experience in shaping library services.
  • We note that the plan also accounts for the total life course of an individual, and that it recognises the importance of early intervention on life outcomes.
  • We are particularly supportive of the recognition of the interconnectedness of the focus areas and acknowledge the challenges that this will bring. We stand ready to contribute to the area of cross-sector partnerships.

 

Special libraries: digital INCITE supplement - May/June 2019

INCITE: The magazine for library and information professionals - May/June 2019 Volume 40 Issue 5/6 (supplement)
 
Special libraries add value to their organisations in ways that are sometimes hard to quantify. While the invaluable work that library and information professionals do to aid research, store information, make knowledge accessible, and create sense from the mess is far too often overlooked. This work is done on a daily basis by special library staff to aid health professionals to make informed diagnoses, help researchers identify connections in their data sets, ensure governments have the information to make evidence-based decisions and so much more. Special libraries and those who work in them make a priceless contribution to their workplaces and deliver tangible results that should not be ignored.

Serving users in Central Australia

Article by Desert Peoples Centre Campus Library staff, from INCITE March/April 2019 Volume 40 Issue 3/4 - Indigenous Matters.
 
Desert Peoples Centre Campus Library staff, from the Batchelor Institute of Indigenous Tertiary Education in Central Australia, provide a range of services to Indigenous Australian people every day. Each team member came to the job via a unique path. In this article they share the story of their growth as library service providers.

Special libraries directory 2020, 2nd edition

ALIA’s Special Libraries Working Group has put together this directory of special libraries to support collaboration. This directory is an update of the 2019 edition, and is not a comprehensive listing, but it does identify like-minded individuals working in similar situations. The aim is to enable people to share non-competitive information, insight, expertise, ideas and resources; to improve the sense of connectedness in a sector with many one-person libraries, and to strengthen special libraries’ advocacy network.

Submission in response to the Productivity Commission Data Availability and Use issues paper

We welcome this opportunity to respond to the Productivity Commission Data Availability and Use Issues Paper. Library and information professionals work with data every day: we capture data; we help store data and make it accessible; we help make data discoverable; we help others find the data they need; we contribute to data policy discussions.
 
While we are aware of the potential risks to individuals’ privacy, mitigation strategies exist and we are also aware of the benefits of releasing data into the world. On a grand scale, the work of library and information professionals in making data more accessible and discoverable supports a stronger evidence-based approach to policy development in government and greater innovation through humanities and science research initiatives. At a less macro level, making data available through libraries can support small businesses and entrepreneurs with new product development and it can help individuals with their own projects. Family historians, for examples, are dedicated users of digitised newspapers and local history collections.
 
ALIA's response to the Productivity Commission Data Availability and Use Issues Paper (April 2016) includes eight recommendations.

Pages