Advanced Search

ALIA Library

Subject Benchmark Statement: Librarianship, Information, Knowledge, Records and Archives Management (Undergraduate and Postgraduate)

The subject benchmark standard for librarianship, information, knowledge, records and archives management defines the academic standards that can be expected of a graduate, in terms of what they might know, do and understand at the end of their studies, and describes the nature of the subject.
 
This document is reproduced with permission from QAA. The statement is scheduled to be revised in 2023.

ALA’s Core Competences of Librarianship

The American Library Association Core Competences (ALACCs) reflect basic knowledge gained through LIS education, job on-boarding, and ongoing professional development early in a library career. It is essential that library professionals working throughout their careers in school, academic, public, special, and governmental libraries be life-long learners to acquire specialized and advanced knowledge beyond those specified in this Core Competences document.
 
This document is a draft version last revised 6 March 2021. It is reproduced with permission from the ALA.

Professional Pathways Frameworks Project: Technical Report Overview

This document presents an overview of the major Professional Pathways Frameworks Project Technical Report, commissioned by the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA), which has been prepared as part of the Professional Pathways project. The Technical Report documents the findings from a major literature review and environmental scan to develop a clear understanding of the diverse and often complex issues relating to the education and qualification pathways into the library and information profession.
 
The research activities examined five key themes: the specific knowledge and skills required by library and information professionals, the values and ethics that underpin professional practice, the current qualification pathways into the profession, the role of micro-credentials in professional pathways, and the value of continuing professional development for professional recognition.

Professional Pathways Frameworks Project: Technical Report

This Technical Report presents the detailed findings of the enquiry by the project which focus on skills frameworks, professional ethics and values, qualification pathways, future views of education and training, continuous professional development and professional status.
 
This Technical Report makes it clear that ALIA’s investment in the Professional Pathways initiative is timely and vital to meet the challenges and opportunities of the evolving work environment. Governments, employers, educators and workers (current and future) are all aware of the need to change the traditional model of education for and training in the professions to drive excellence and currency among professionals. A new mindset of life-long active professionalism, based on core ethics and values and with support for whole-of-career development, is needed for libraries and information services to grow and develop in line with advances in society and technologies. 
 

ALIA international relations statement

The Australian Library and Information Association is committed to active participation in the global library community, supporting international library associations, providing leadership through ALIA’s expertise and promoting greater understanding of international librarianship and library issues in the global information environment.
 
Relationships with international associations and organisations will be consistent with ALIA’s core values and reflect ALIA’s expertise, capability and capacity.
 
This document presents the statement made by ALIA regarding its global activities as of February 2022.
 
This statement replaces:
 

"ALIA and international relations" (Adopted 1997. Amended 2001. Reviewed 2009. Amended 2018.)
 
and 
 
"ALIA's relationships with overseas library associations policy statement" (March 2013. Amended 2018.)
 

 

Sustainable Development Goals: Stretch targets baseline report

10 Sustainable Development Goal stretch targets are proposed for libraries in Australia from 2020-2030, following a period of refinement from September 2019. Targets address literacy; access to knowledge; equitable access; culture and heritage; sustainable communities; contribution to health and wellbeing; diversity and gender equality; lifelong learning; and global citizenship. 
 
The report tracks the current status of lead agencies against the SDG stretch targets as of January 2022. 

Kaya Curtin!

Article from INCITE March/April 2022 Volume 43 Issue 2.
 
Staff at Curtin University Library in Perth outline some of the initiatives they have recently implemented to better engage with Indigenous perspectives in their services and spaces. Initiatives include creating a book club, producing a podcast series and commissioning new artworks – all guided by the ‘nothing about us without us’ maxim.

Digital health literacy: Final program report February 2022

In 2019, the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) in partnership with Australian Public Library Alliance (APLA) and ALIA Health Libraries Australia (HLA), was successful in application to the Australian Digital Health Agency (ADHA) to be a My Health Record (MHR) Consumer Education Community Delivery Partner. The aim of ALIA’s MHR education program was to deliver training to public library staff and relevant community partners so that they would be able to respond to enquiries about MHR, to be proactive in offering information about MHR, and feel confident when providing guidance about issues relating to community members MHRs.
 
This final report shares program outcomes, figures, community case studies and the ongoing commitment to support ADHA MHR consumer learning program.

Australian Library and Information Association Annual Report 2021

 
Contents: About ALIA -- President’s report -- Chief Executive Officer’s report -- Business director’s report -- Director of policy and education’s report -- Director Conferences and Events’s report -- How we performed against th ALIA Board’s Strategic Plan -- Our membership -- Advocacy campaigns -- Government and stakeholder relations -- Conferences and events  -- ALIA in the regions  -- Education, professional development, and training  -- Awards  -- Communications  -- Financial statements 
 
 

Greening libraries report

The overarching aim of the Greening Libraries research project is to underpin the Australian Library and Information Association’s focus on sustainability, in line with its commitment to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The report aims to highlight examples of best practice and inform the creation of a toolkit for libraries to help them support environmental action, further the greening libraries movement as well as exemplify sustainability practices that are consistent with United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.
 
This report is the second output from the Greening Libraries research project, and was commissioned by the Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA) with the support of the Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL).

Australian Interlibrary Resource Sharing (ILRS) Code

The ILRS Code has been endorsed by the Australia Library Peak bodies including Australian Library and Information Association (ALIA), National and State Libraries Australia (NSLA), the Council of Australian University Librarians (CAUL) and the National Library of Australia.
 
The Interlibrary Resource Sharing (ILRS) Code (together with the Best Practice Guidelines) is designed to support a multi-faceted approach to resource sharing based on reciprocality, cooperation and fairness between libraries, respect for the moral and intellectual rights of creators and publishers and compliance with legal and contractual obligations.
 
This version of the Code was adopted in December 2019 and came into effect 1 April 2020. It replaces the "Australian Interlibrary Resource Sharing (ILRS) Code" (2013).
 
The Code has been updated to show the recommended fees (rounded up/down to the nearest 10 cents) for July 2022 to June 2023. It came into effect July 1 2022.
 

Professional Pathways Focus Group Consultation Report

This report documents the focus group consultation activities undertaken by ALIA in early 2022 as part of the Professional Pathways initiative.
Following the Technical Report, the ALIA Professional Pathways Board made four recommendations, one of which was to develop a framework of knowledge, skills and ethical behaviour as a sector-wide, whole-of-career resource to guide and support professional learning and development. As part of the consultation process proposed in this recomendation, a series of focus groups was conducted to explore the concepts of the professional framework, professional identity and active professionalism. This report presents the focus group methodology employed and the processes involved in the collection and content analysis of the qualitative research data. The principal themes identified in the focus group discussions are reviewed including issues relating to the contemporary LIS profession, insights into the individual’s career journey, concerns about LIS education and the characteristics of the fields of professional knowledge and skills. The challenges and opportunities for diverse pathways into the LIS profession are explored, as well as the concept of active professionalism. The thematic analysis closes with a summary of the focus group participants’ views about a potential sector-wide, whole-of-career framework.

Critical information literacy and non-traditional research methods: a case study of practice-led research and music students

ALIA National 2022 Conference, 16 May - 19 May 2022 Canberra: Diversity
 

Abstract: Critical information literacy is about challenging the social and political powers at play in every stage of the information life cycle. Challenging these dynamics allow libraries to discover new ways to connect, engage, and empower a more diverse user-base. This presentation examines critical information literacy and its importance to academic librarians. Large philosophical ideas will be explored, from critical information literacy and its connection to critical pedagogy, particularly through the work of Paulo Freire. From there, non-traditional research outputs (NTROs) and methods will be discussed. The connection between NTROs and critical information literacy is underrepresented in the literature and presents an opportunity for academic librarians to demonstrate their value in this relatively new field. Employing a critical approach allows academic librarians to strengthen their relationships with student and staff. Indeed, many existing methods that are well known to librarians can be employed to this end, from collaborative methods such as flipped classroom and dialogic approach to students as partners. The presentation will bring these issues into focus by discussing a case study: an information literacy session on practice-led research delivered to second year Bachelor of Music students. The literature around teaching practice-led research at an undergraduate level is sparse. While initially daunting, developing this session provided a valuable collaborative learning experience alongside teaching faculty, and enabled me to develop my skills as facilitator. The case study will explore how the session came about, how it was delivered, the challenges faced, and the benefits of moving into a practice-led space. One benefit in particular that stood out to me was that by discussing practice-led research with music students early in their undergraduate degree, and linking it to their individual creative practice, students are provided more opportunities to see themselves as researchers, and to see their ideas as valuable and academically worthy. The library has an exciting role to play in bridging the gap between practice and research in creative disciplines. In this presentation, I hope to spark a conversation around how academic libraries can engage with critical information literacy in order to challenge their own stance within academia, to advocate for more diverse and inclusive practices, and to deepen the support we provide to students and staff.
 
Diversity is broader than providing diverse collections and services – our diverse communities need to know that libraries are challenging systems of inequity, including the position that libraries hold within these systems, no matter how uncomfortable that idea is. Critical pedagogy and critical information literacy are vital in moving libraries into this space in order to empower our users. Librarians in academic institutions hold a unique position; we are educators and critical thinkers but often without the confines of assessment. In this presentation I will discuss why we should see this as a strength and how the informal learning space fosters critical thinking through collaboration via a dialogic approach. A case study will demonstrate the practical application of these broad philosophical ideas in the library information literacy session. Libraries should advocate diversity within research approaches. The case study explores library-teacher collaboration in delivering a session about practice-led research. Students in artistic disciplines personal creative practices represent a diverse cohort, which may not be fully captured within a traditional curriculum. Practice-led research implicitly recognises the value of these culturally and intellectually diverse practices within an institutional context. The library’s role, may lead to greater engagement and stronger creative output from student artists.
 
 
 
 
 

 

Critical information literacy and non-traditional research methods: a case study of practice-led research and music students [slides]

ALIA National 2022 Conference, 16 May - 19 May 2022 Canberra: Diversity
 

Abstract: Critical information literacy is about challenging the social and political powers at play in every stage of the information life cycle. Challenging these dynamics allow libraries to discover new ways to connect, engage, and empower a more diverse user-base. This presentation examines critical information literacy and its importance to academic librarians. Large philosophical ideas will be explored, from critical information literacy and its connection to critical pedagogy, particularly through the work of Paulo Freire. From there, non-traditional research outputs (NTROs) and methods will be discussed. The connection between NTROs and critical information literacy is underrepresented in the literature and presents an opportunity for academic librarians to demonstrate their value in this relatively new field. Employing a critical approach allows academic librarians to strengthen their relationships with student and staff. Indeed, many existing methods that are well known to librarians can be employed to this end, from collaborative methods such as flipped classroom and dialogic approach to students as partners. The presentation will bring these issues into focus by discussing a case study: an information literacy session on practice-led research delivered to second year Bachelor of Music students. The literature around teaching practice-led research at an undergraduate level is sparse. While initially daunting, developing this session provided a valuable collaborative learning experience alongside teaching faculty, and enabled me to develop my skills as facilitator. The case study will explore how the session came about, how it was delivered, the challenges faced, and the benefits of moving into a practice-led space. One benefit in particular that stood out to me was that by discussing practice-led research with music students early in their undergraduate degree, and linking it to their individual creative practice, students are provided more opportunities to see themselves as researchers, and to see their ideas as valuable and academically worthy. The library has an exciting role to play in bridging the gap between practice and research in creative disciplines. In this presentation, I hope to spark a conversation around how academic libraries can engage with critical information literacy in order to challenge their own stance within academia, to advocate for more diverse and inclusive practices, and to deepen the support we provide to students and staff.
 
Diversity is broader than providing diverse collections and services – our diverse communities need to know that libraries are challenging systems of inequity, including the position that libraries hold within these systems, no matter how uncomfortable that idea is. Critical pedagogy and critical information literacy are vital in moving libraries into this space in order to empower our users. Librarians in academic institutions hold a unique position; we are educators and critical thinkers but often without the confines of assessment. In this presentation I will discuss why we should see this as a strength and how the informal learning space fosters critical thinking through collaboration via a dialogic approach. A case study will demonstrate the practical application of these broad philosophical ideas in the library information literacy session. Libraries should advocate diversity within research approaches. The case study explores library-teacher collaboration in delivering a session about practice-led research. Students in artistic disciplines personal creative practices represent a diverse cohort, which may not be fully captured within a traditional curriculum. Practice-led research implicitly recognises the value of these culturally and intellectually diverse practices within an institutional context. The library’s role, may lead to greater engagement and stronger creative output from student artists.
 
 
 
 
 

 

Laughter and Tears: The Memory Room Project and creating dementia friendly libraries [slides]

ALIA National 2022 Conference, 16 May - 19 May 2022 Canberra: Diversity
 

Abstract: Did you know that dementia is the leading cause of death in women in Australia and the second leading cause of death of all Australians? An estimated 250 people are diagnosed with dementia in Australia every day. Dementia Australia's 2021 report, Discrimination and dementia – enough is enough, draws attention to the widespread discrimination endured by people living with dementia and challenges us as individuals, organisations, and communities to shift established attitudes. Why does this matter to library services? It matters because 70% of people with dementia live in our communities and want to continue to access and use their local services. A diagnosis of dementia increases a person's feeling of social isolation. Libraries can create inclusive services and spaces and play a vital role in helping those with dementia to remain included, accepted and connected to their community. Newcastle Libraries are leading the sector in creating a dementia friendly library service. It has taken a four-tiered approach to engaging the dementia community by: 1. Staff training through the Dementia Australia’s Dementia-friendly community program 2. Designing and delivering programs including the Memory Room, the Magic Table and the podcast series, Laughter and Tears: living with dementia 3. Free access to library meeting spaces for organisations such as Dementia Australia to host education and information sessions 4. Auditing library physical spaces to improve access and inclusion Kay Pisel will relate her experience in coordinating Newcastle Libraries' dementia-friendly program including engaging staff in the training process, collaborating with people living with dementia and their families in the program's development; and building relationships with Dementia Australia educators and other service providers in the local area. Program initiatives include: Memory Room Program This program engages an art therapist who facilitates fortnightly face-to-face sessions for community members living with dementia and their families. The therapist draws on photos from the local history collection to enable participants to reflect and participate in conversation, intellectual stimulation, and creativity activity. Magic Table (Tovertafel) Newcastle Libraries have recently purchased a Tovertafel. It is a projector that beams mounted on a ceiling that projects interactive games onto a table. The games are specifically designed for people living with dementia. As the colourful objects respond to hand and arm movements, participants play with the light images reflected on the table. The interactive games stimulate both physical and cognitive activity and encourage social interaction. Laughter and Tears: living with dementia The podcast series was created for Dementia Action Week, 2021. Hosted by ABC broadcaster, Dan Cox, the series invites members of the community living with dementia to share their experiences of love, loss, courage, and hope. It provides current information from medical experts and looks at dementia services available in the Hunter region and beyond. Libraries already provide wonderful and targeted services for our communities. We are very well placed to help shape the narrative around inclusion and access for people living with dementia and help improve their quality of life through our library services.
 
 

 

Describing our past and our future: applying indigenous subject headings [slides]

ALIA National 2022 Conference, 16 May - 19 May 2022 Canberra: Diversity
 
Abstract: Cataloguers have the unique ability to make an item discoverable, make it hard to find, or assign value and significance. The application of specific subject headings can reflect current cultural thinking and personal bias. At worst, subject headings can reflect dated, racist, or derogatory language and as a consequence be re-traumatising. Cataloguing tools have not always considered different perspectives and social structures. The AIATSIS Pathways thesauri (http://www1.aiatsis.gov.au/index.asp) is an internationally recognised subject standard that allows any library to describe First Nations material in way that makes it more discoverable by Indigenous and non-Indigenous users, is respectful and appropriate and less likely to re-traumatise. Using the Thesaurus enables libraries to describe collection material with greater cultural integrity, meaning and respect. This presentation will explore the history and future of the AIATSIS Pathway Thesaurus and way in which Trove and the National Library have embedded it into their work. Co-delivered by staff from the National Library’s Indigenous Engagement Section, Trove and AIATSIS, this session will: • discuss why this work is so important • learn more about how the AIATSIS Pathway Thesaurus was developed and how it is continuing to be enhanced • provide insight into the how Trove uses the Thesaurus to enhance the discoverability of Indigenous material, and; • look at how other libraries can use the AIATSIS Thesauri to enhance the description and discoverability of First Nations material in their collections This presentation provides a unique opportunity to hear about the Thesaurus from a number of inter-related perspectives. National Library’s Assistant Director of Indigenous Engagement Rebecca Bateman will discuss the importance of the AIATSIS Thesaurus to her as a library professional and why describing First Nations material appropriately, respectfully and meaningfully is so critical from an Indigenous perspective. Jen Douglas, Metadata Coordinator, Descriptive Metadata and Cataloguing at AIATSIS will talk about the Pathways Thesaurus – how it was developed, what are its features, where is it heading in the future, and how libraries can access the Thesaurus. In 2020 the National Library launched a new Trove, the first major redesign since its launch in 2009. One of the goals of new Trove was to make the service a culturally safer space for First Nations people. We could not have achieved these initiatives without the Thesaurus or the Austlang language codes. However, there is more to do to make Trove genuinely safe, and that must be a collaborative effort. Catriona Bryce, Assistant Director Trove Data Support will outline what was achieved in the redesign and some potential pathways forward.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Greening Libraries - Environmental Sustainability Through Victorian Public Libraries and Beyond [slides]

ALIA National 2022 Conference, 16 May - 19 May 2022 Canberra: Diversity
 
Abstract: Our session will delve into what diverse Victorian public libraries are doing to support their community in environmental sustainability and how the UN Sustainable Development Goals can be applied in diverse ways, offering an exceptional framework to build sustainable practices into libraries. We will be sharing our project journey, including how we have set up a PLV Special Interest Group (SIG) on environmental sustainability to enable diverse vices, ideas and people to come together to add strength to initiatives and lead to stronger outcomes in sustainability efforts. The Public Libraries Victoria (PLV) Environmental Sustainability Special Interest Group (SIG) was established in September 2021 to bring together metropolitan and regional library professionals who are vocal and passionate about the role libraries can play in encouraging communities to become more environmentally sustainable. The SIG was proposed by members of the 2021 Shared Leadership Program facilitated by State Library Victoria and PLV, in response to identifying the need for libraries to support their communities to become more environmentally sustainable. The SIG meets quarterly and works to increase environmental sustainability efforts in libraries and move towards embedding the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) into daily practice. At the inaugural meeting on Monday 13 September 2021, there were fifteen members in attendance, representing 10 different Victorian library services. Two weeks on from this initial meeting, the SIG now has 18 members, representing 13 services. The team is deeply committed to ensuring a diverse lens continues to drive this vital sustainability work. Special Interest Group Purpose To share resources, contacts, and information to support members to engage with their communities in the area of environmental sustainability. To provide a forum for sharing ideas and promoting best practice in libraries. To provide training and development opportunities that increase public library staff knowledge in the area of environmental sustainability. To strengthen the profile of various libraries and their presence in the wider community. To advocate for the important role that libraries can play in environmental sustainability. We will also share our progress and upcoming plan for a resource portal for library staff to access a broad range of resources on sustainability.
 
 
 

Library programming can be a real drag… if you want it to be! [slides]

ALIA National 2022 Conference, 16 May - 19 May 2022 Canberra: Diversity
 
Abstract: Our library service strives to be an inclusive space. We have considered our programs, spaces and collections in relation to the LGBTQIA+ communities and the same for those people living with a disability, and continue to improve our offerings, but we had never considered how these intersect. Whilst much might be known about the social, health and well-being needs of people with disability more generally, little is known about the social interactions and social opportunities available for people who identify LGBTIQ+ and with a disability within the Moreton Bay Region. What are the social interactions and opportunities needed for this demographic and how can we support them? This presentation outlines our collaborative approach, alongside the University of the Sunshine Coast, to begin to explore this space. We posed the question: “Can dress be the conduit for greater inclusivity in regional Australian communities where people identify as both queer and crip ?”. The initial scope aimed to identify if there is a Queer Crip community in the Moreton Bay Region, and if so, what their expressed social and community needs are. It was decided that a social event that includes opportunity for consultation with the LGTBQI+Q with disability in the Moreton Bay Region be undertaken. On May 17th, 2021, known as IDAHOBIT , a public event held in the North Lakes Public Library called Fab Abled brought together members of these communities who also identify as living with a disability. The event format was a panel discussion on how dress is used in the construction of identities. The panel consisted of Ms. Lisa Cox, an advocate for better representation of people with a disability in fashion media, Chinta Woo Allcock, a drag queen who is a person of colour and expert in cultural identity through language as well as local drag queen hostess, Tilly Screams who has Marfan Syndrome . Tilly Screams performed a song and dance in persona. The event was very well received and in this presentation we present our approach to planning, the learnings, and offer support and advice to other libraries services that want to support LGBTQIA+ and Queer Crip communities with a similar event of their own.
 
 
 

Change management: redesigning, reskilling and redeploying

National Library and Information Technicians' Symposium, 30 October - 1 November 2013, Canberra: waves of change.
This paper examines the change management process from the announcement of the change through to the implementation of the new supplier. The paper presents findings from team surveys and interviews conducted throughout the process. Recommendations are given for staff facing similar changes in their own work environments.

Creating a workforce that reflects the diversity of the community through workforce planning

ALIA National 2022 Conference, 16 May - 19 May 2022 Canberra: Diversity
 
This conference paper discusses the efforts made, outcomes achieved and lessons learned from Wollongong City Libraries' Workforce Planning Project.
 
Abstract: The ALIA Strategic Plan 2020-24 prioritises the need for a diverse workforce. ALIA has demonstrated its commitment to ‘…support a resilient, diverse workforce: attracting and developing talented, committed individuals from different cultural backgrounds, who will have the strength and agility to navigate a rapidly changing workplace.’ Similarly, Wollongong City Libraries (WCL) is currently undertaking workforce planning to attract a skilled, diverse and dynamic workforce among other objectives. WCL would like to share an overview of the efforts made, outcomes achieved and lessons learned from the workforce planning process with the ALIA community in May 2022. The City of Wollongong is a Local Government Area (LGA) in the Illawarra region about 80km south of Sydney and is the third-largest city in New South Wales. It was originally inhabited by the Dharawal people and today is home to nearly a quarter of a million people. According to the data in Our Wollongong 2028 Community Strategic Plan: • 2.6% of the population identified as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. • 20% were born overseas in countries like the UK, China, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Italy and New Zealand, and 78% of the population only spoke English at home. • The city’s population is ageing with consistent growth in the proportion of people aged 50 years and over. • 29.0% of households earned a low income ($0 to $750 per week). • Of people aged 15 and over, 13.1% reported having completed Year 12 as their highest level of educational attainment, 28.1% had completed a Certificate III-Advanced Diploma and 17.4% had completed a university qualification. WCL is undergoing workforce planning as part of an ongoing cycle of continuous imrovement as the environment and business changes. There are four objectives relevant to workforce diversity: • Address the changing role of libraries, offering contemporary library services and practices; • Create structure that best supports delivery of our future functions; • Create a workforce with the capabilities and attributes we need for the future; and • Develop processes so that we attract, develop and sustain a skilled, diverse and dynamic workforce that can achieve the service outcomes we are committed to. In 2020-21, concrete actions have been taken towards creating a more diverse workforce: • Attracting and hiring professionals with specialist skillsets and attributes regardless of a lack of experience in libraries. In 2021, an educator with project management experience was appointed in a new role Project Leader Learning City, and an Education and Experience Coordinator from the University of Wollongong was awarded the role of Librarian – Programs and Events. • In 2021 a targeted Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander traineeship role was established and promoted through a local Aboriginal employment agency. The recruitment • In 2020 a young person with autism was appointed as a casual Library Assistant through a strong partnership with a local school that offers a range of services to support children on the autism spectrum. WCL would like to share the outcomes and lessons learned from the workforce planning process and promote discussion around creating a more diverse workforce in Australian libraries.
 

 
 

 

Beyond the library: library professionals working in diverse emerging roles

ALIA National 2022 Conference, 16 May - 19 May 2022 Canberra: Diversity
 
Session description: Library professionals have traditionally worked within a library setting and often in roles with the explicit job title of librarian. Beyond traditional library roles, there are diverse emerging roles and job titles ideally suited to the knowledge, skills and experiences of library professionals. Library professionals are utilising their skills to gain employment in roles as diverse as technologists, user experience designers and knowledge managers. This paper will explore the extent to which Australian library professionals are already working in diverse roles which draw on their library and information professional skill set. It will examine the various pathways which library professionals have taken to move into such roles and their motivation for taking a career path beyond libraries. It will consider how traditional library and information professionals' knowledge, skills and attributes can be adapted to such emerging roles and the ongoing identification of people in these roles with the library profession. Finally, it will consider what the increasing diversity of roles available to library professionals might mean for the wider profession.
 
 
 
 

Revealing the activities of the Methodist Missionary Society through film

ALIA National 2022 Conference, 16 May - 19 May 2022 Canberra: Diversity
 
Session description: Over the past 10 years the State Library of NSW has undertaken a massive digital preservation project including a focus on the Library’s moving image collections. More than 250 film and video collections have been identified for digitisation, using uniqueness, significance, physical condition and playback equipment obsolescence as criteria for selection. The records of the Sydney-based Methodist Missionary Society (MMS) of Australasia were deposited with the Mitchell Library in the early 1950s with further additions over time. The organisation later became known as the Methodist Overseas Mission. Their extensive collection includes over 300 manuscript boxes, photographs, slides, negatives, and 159 film reels. The Methodist Missionary Society of Australasia set up a number of Missions in the North of Australia from 1916. Their mission at Milingimbi Island, among the Yolngu people of Eastern Arnhem Land, was begun in 1923 and continued operating up to 1974. In 1961, the work of the MMS at Milingimbi was featured in the Society's commissioned film Faces in the Sun. The documentary highlighted the experiences of four different communities in the Northern Territory. Directed by Cecil Holmes, Faces in the Sun, like many of the films produced by the MMS, is an insight into the Stolen Generations era. Other documentaries produced by the MMS include titles such as Man Dark No More (1953) and Man of Two Worlds (1965). They were of course proselytising Christianity but also reflected the Australian Government’s assimilationist policies. There are projection prints and second-generation copies of this film scattered in various libraries around the country. However, the first-generation original master material held, and now digitised, by the Library, is a unique and valuable record that captures the high-quality detail of the director’s original intent. As well as documenting an important time in the history of the Northern Territory and Australia.
 
 
 
 

Pages