Library science

Future of the library and information science profession: public libraries. Summary

There were 12 themes that emerged from this report specific to the 1,500 public libraries in Australia. 1. 50:50 by 2020. 2. Reading: a national pastime. 3. New media. 4. Support for the creative economy. 5. Community created content. 6. It's not all about the book. 7. Maker spaces. 8. Enterprise hubs. 9. Online learning. 10. Everyone a member. 11. Local services through a national network. 12. The meaning of free.

Future of the library and information science profession: public libraries

There are some 1,505 public library service points across Australia, including 1,429 fixed point and 76 mobile libraries. These services are funded by local and state or territory government in New South Wales, the Northern Territory, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria and Western Australia, and by the State Government in Tasmania and the ACT Government in Canberra. 

Future of the library and information profession: special libraries. Summary

Ten themes emerged from our consultation relating specifically to special libraries, including government, law, health, corporate, engineering, science, art and others. 1. Radical transformation. 2. Value proposition. 3. DIY information. 4. Ready to use. 5. A seat at the top table. 6. Centralise and embed. 7. Big data. 8. Digitisation. 9. Subject specialisation. 10. Space.

Future of the library and information science profession: special libraries

Special libraries comprise government, association, health, law, corporate, consulting firm, ICT, engineering, religious, science and technology, art, museum, agriculture, media and other libraries that serve departments, institutions, not-for-profits, charities and businesses. The word library doesn’t always appear in the title, instead some are called information services or research units, terms which also describe their main purpose and function.

Future of the library and information science profession: collecting institutions

The nation’s nine collecting institutions are the National Library of Australia, the State Libraries of New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria and Western Australia, the ACT Heritage Library and the Northern Territory Library. The primary role of these libraries is to collect, preserve and provide access to the documentary history of Australia, including books, manuscripts, documents, images, maps and other materials, in print, digital and other formats. The collective body representing these institutions is the National and State Libraries Australasia (NSLA). 

Future of the library and information science profession: library and information professionals

Every year, some 800 people graduate from an Australian university or TAFE, with a professional qualification in library and information science. Often it is a second career choice, and this contributes to the diversity of age and experience within the sector. Graduates with a degree or Masters qualification are eligible to become an ALIA Associate member, and those with a VET certificate or diploma, an ALIA Library Technician member. 

Future of the library and information science profession: action list

In 2013, ALIA set out to investigate the big questions about our future: how will libraries remain relevant for users?; what changes will institutions and individuals in the sector experience?; will ‘library and information professional’ continue to be a necessary and desirable occupation? Challenging, insightful, inspiring responses to our request for feedback at events held all around Australia was received.  As a result, ALIA has been able to identify themes and develop actions that will support positive outcomes. The findings from the project have been produced as seven reports.

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